That White Film on the Jackets...

Discussion in 'Care / Preservation' started by spencer.hoglund, Mar 18, 2015.

  1. spencer.hoglund

    spencer.hoglund Member

    Messages:
    30
    As a new collector, I bought a couple of A2's that have the white film on them - from old leather conditioner as I later learned. The jackets are nice and named otherwise, so theyre worth saving.

    This didnt bother me at first, but now that I know, I want it off.

    Has anyone had any luck removing this? Any secret home remedies?

    Im sure this has been discussed, but I couldnt find the thread. If anyone can link me to that, I can save you all the keystrokes.

    Thanks you
     
  2. Silver Surfer

    Silver Surfer Well-Known Member

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    1,834
    the film is probably mold. saddle soap works wonders removing it and any aromas that come from the mold..
     
  3. Skyhawk

    Skyhawk Active Member

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    320
    Saddle soap leaves residue too, that turns a greenish white with age and corrodes metal parts. It could even be saddle soap residue you are dealing with. I wouldn't use it.

    Buff residue off with a soft rag and a little warm water. If needed you can use Lexol leather cleaner. It is PH balanced and will not harm the leather (Available at tack and riding stores). Follow up after it's dry with a light coat of Renapur leather balsam (available for cheap at Amazon). It is a natural beeswax and mineral conditioner. I have found it far superior to Pecards conditioner. Which is petroleum based and leaves more residue. Also browse through the Care & Preservation section on the forum.
     
  4. Silver Surfer

    Silver Surfer Well-Known Member

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    1,834
    yup, could by improperly applied saddle soap. yup, saddle soap will leave a residue.....if ya dont follow the instructions on the can. after cleaning with saddle soap, wipe off with a damp cloth. as said, ive used it successfully. try it on an unseen area, like under the pocket flap. agreed, on the pecards. it leaves a kinda tacky film on the hides. i havent used it in years.
     
  5. John Lever

    John Lever Moderator

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    6,256
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    Southern England
    Ian, DrH is our resident chemist and will know how best to remove it.
     
  6. ausreenactor

    ausreenactor Well-Known Member

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    3,582
    Location:
    Mildura, heart of the Mallee.
    I thought it may have been a phenomena relating to the arrival of a collector's first Good Wear? Sorry, my bad. :oops:
     
  7. TankBuster

    TankBuster Active Member

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    Location:
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    I 2nd all above^. Just use a rag and warm water at first. If that doesn't work, Lexol will remove it for good. Be careful with the Lexol though. Apply gently and sparingly. As others have said, Pecards is a decent last resort if something really needs it, otherwise jackets are best left alone and stored in the right conditions. Back in the day, pecards was touted as the save all for dry original jackets so I'm not surprised you are running into so many jackets that have had pecards applied. Many collectors used it. Lucky for me I rarely ever did. The good news is, you can get that white film off.
     
  8. spencer.hoglund

    spencer.hoglund Member

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    30
    I sure appreciate learning from you guys. Thank you
     
  9. a2jacketpatches

    a2jacketpatches Active Member

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    Northern California
    You talkin bout what I think you're talkin bout?[​IMG]
     
  10. foster

    foster New Member

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    410
    I've seen some items treated with Pecard's. They were waxy and somewhat sticky to the touch. I would not use it on anything, unless it was in dire need of conservation.

    Personally, I have had good results with Huberd's and their products are supposed to be natural. I've used their neatsfoot oil on some dry jackets, and their boot grease on footwear, but I think the grease would work better on a jacket than Pecard's.
     
  11. havocpaul

    havocpaul Active Member

    Messages:
    1,691
    Location:
    South London, UK
    I have used just a mild soap and water to remove that kind of mark. I only recently found this interview with John Chapman (a superb insight and great article!) and was interested in his comments about Pecards and his use of Vaseline as a preferred treatment for old and dry leathers....http://www.denimbro.com/john-chapman-of ... c1101.html
     

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