Long Shearling coats at the Front

Discussion in 'General Flight Jacket Discussion' started by m444uk, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. Vcruiser

    Vcruiser Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,069
    Location:
    EastCentral Indiana
    Doesn't look like the same bike as Andrew's photo to me. Much different frame, tank, and engine configuration. The cylinders are vertical on the DKW, as most bikes are designed, whereas the model has horizontal cylinders such as BMW.
     
  2. tom james

    tom james Member

    Messages:
    184
    Location:
    Virginia
    Certainly looks like a DKW, later design given to the allies as war booty in the form of BSA C1(?), Puch, & Harley-Davidson Sprint(1st generation).
     
  3. m444uk

    m444uk Member

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    547
    See post 7. Fallschirmjager bike
     
    Vcruiser likes this.
  4. m444uk

    m444uk Member

    Messages:
    547
    Nice looking Zundapp here


    DKW
     
  5. Andrew

    Andrew Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,575
    Location:
    Sunshine Coast, Australia
    Certainly is. I wonder whether those reversed brake and clutch handles ever caused a problem- especially with thick heavy gloves.
     
  6. ties70

    ties70 Active Member

    Messages:
    456
    Location:
    Hamburg / Germany
    @Andrew,

    that is quite a story...

    My Grandfather was a policeman in the mid 30s and decided to join the Wehrmacht to become a career soldier.
    His unit was the Infanterie Regiment 90, the "Ratzeburger Jaeger".

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    Their motto was: "Regardless of consequences" or "At any sacrifice"

    Here he is with members of his squad:
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    With his platoon:
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    His wedding day parade uniform:
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    As a career soldier, he was involved in WWII right from the first day.

    In fact, he got wounded on the morning of Sept. 1, 1939.
    Head shot, right through the helmet...

    He woke up in a military hospital near Hamburg a few days later, while my Grandmother was still unaware of his injuries. Waiting for news from the front, my Grandma got the news when a couple of his comrades turned up at Ratzeburg with some flowers and the helmet....

    Our brain must be an exciting organ, with a great capacity to shift abilities from one part to another and shortwire functions, because after a couple of weeks, in which he had to learn basic skills like walking and speaking, his health rapidly increased. I can remember that the only things left from that injury were a kind of numbness in one hand and around his mouth.

    In early 1940, Grandpa was good as new, working in a quartermaster depot near Hamburg.

    Now comes the stupid part:
    As a "lifer", still looking for a career, he transferred back to his combat unit. Well, he got promoted several times (up to Hauptfeldwebel), and spent most of his time at the Eastern Front, with all the known horrors: Barbarossa, Stalingrad in 1943, escape from the surrounded city...

    He fought and retreated with the Wehrmacht for the next two years and finally became POW in April 1945 in Hungary, and was transferred to Sibiria, where he spent time until January 1950.

    When he came back to Germany, he returned to an estranged wife (who had not returned any of his letters from Russia) and two little girls he hardly knew (one of which he had never seen before). He was physically and mentally broken.

    Somehow they got their s**t together, but that was something they never spoke about. My mum and her little sister were born in 1950 and 1953.

    From all the children and grandchildren it is only me who is interested in this stuff.
    Early on I got fascinated by the bullet-holed helmet on the living room cupboard.
    Today, it's in our living room. I still keep his military drivers license and his sport badges. I have his letters from the Russian POW camp, and it still is very emotional to read things like "Dear Maria, why don't you write back to me?"

    Don't get me wrong.
    This is not meant to be a sentimental "heroes story" to justify the things done by German soldiers or to tell you "It wasn't easy for them, too." I can't even justify done the stuff possibly done by my Grandfather, which might have been totally gruesome, at least it was terrible enough for him not to speak about it.

    In the end, they probably got what they deserved.

    But despite this, he was a human being, with good and bad sides, and he was the best Grandpa I could imagine....

    Best regards,

    Ties
     
  7. m444uk

    m444uk Member

    Messages:
    547
    Luftwaffe shearling. I've noticed that as well as aircrew, some the Luftwaffe ground units on the eastern front had these. Perhaps involved with reconnaissance.
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    Watched the 1993 German film 'Stalingrad' last night for the first time. Well worth viewing.

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    One thing you don't get though is the wider picture. Axis causalities included 200,000 Romanians, 130,000 Italians, and 120,000 Hungarians killed, wounded or captured. That's as many, if not more, than German loses. Yet they have been written out of German history.
     
  8. Richard Cuellar

    Richard Cuellar New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Thank you for sharing your grandfathers story. Regardless of what your judgements are of the German Military during WWII, I think that stories from all sides of the conflict are beneficial and of historical interest.
     
  9. Thomas Koehle

    Thomas Koehle Active Member

    Messages:
    187
    Location:
    Mexico Aguascalientes
    the dispatch rider in leather cloths looks like he is wearing Italian submarine equipment - as far as I have been reading after the Italians split up with Germany there was a lot of Italian gear leftover in german possession - the leather gear was then issued to tank crews so to say as kind of flame resistant protection gear
     
  10. m444uk

    m444uk Member

    Messages:
    547
    Just about everyone seemed to have worn Italian fur parkas. Easy to spot with their distinctive camo pattern.

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  11. Peter Graham

    Peter Graham Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,182
    Location:
    Ireland
    I don't think the parkas were Italian made. The Germans got hold of loads of Italian camo material and made all sorts of uniform items from it. That first shot has the look of a movie still. Would I be right ?
     
  12. m444uk

    m444uk Member

    Messages:
    547
    Google images has the colour photo as taken in the Ardennes 1944.
    Quite a lot of German fleece and fur items were made in Hungary.
    Here's another one which I think is Czech army.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2016
  13. m444uk

    m444uk Member

    Messages:
    547
    I was surprised to see the Kriegsmarine in the Baltic wearing shearling in this late war newsreel at 6.16 mins on.

    There are also some ladies in the boat wearing short issue jackets.
     

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