JACKET DEPOT RE-DYE (HOMEMADE)

Discussion in 'How To Info' started by Pilotomutante, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. Pilotomutante

    Pilotomutante Member

    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    Hi gents, I think it´s time I share something in exchange for all the fun and knowledge I get from all you fellow VLJ members. I´ve been doing some experiments with Eco-Flo from Tandy leather Factory.

    First step is to strip the entire jacket from the old finish to expose the leather. I used acetone and lots of rubbing. Do this in a very well ventilated place, upwind and well protected from fumes. Once stripped the jacket looks like this:


    [​IMG]


    Next you take the dye, thinn it with some water (dye is water based) and using a brush start to apply it. I used Bison Brown which is quite a dark brown:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Moment of panic:

    [​IMG]

    It takes two hands for proper covering. When finished I applied a generous amount of "Satin Shene" conditioner (also from Eco-Flo) And that is about it. The results are spectacular, with a beautiful finish that shows the grain and will look much better over time when as a result of use starts to rub off and show the leather tones under.




    [​IMG]


    Overall it is a simple procedure you can confidently do yourself and will give a whole new life to your jacket. Enjoy!!!
     
  2. ferhama

    ferhama New Member

    Messages:
    16
    I know your panic feelings during the dyed. I think the reason is water soluble dye. The alcohol soluble dye is most penetrant in leather and works faster
    Note: The most interesting use of a spanish diary since years. ;)
    Good Job!
     
  3. Persimmon

    Persimmon Member

    Messages:
    973
    Location:
    Nottingham England

    You are certainly brave. Well done.

    Looking at the finished result picture, both pockets appear to still have the "moment of panic" mottled effect on them.

    Is that just a trick of the light ?
    Could you post a few more finished results front and back please

    Especially out door pictures
     
  4. Pilotomutante

    Pilotomutante Member

    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
    It certainly is by far the best thing you can do with the news around here. Thank you!

    That is correct, the unequal finished remained in the pockets. Thing is it does not trouble me too much and I think that with time and some use they will fade away. They are also evident on the back of the jacket. That I should redo:


    [​IMG]
     
  5. RayR

    RayR Member

    Messages:
    120
    Very interesting. Thanks for sharing this in such detail :)
     
  6. a2jacketpatches

    a2jacketpatches Active Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    Location:
    Northern California
    Could you do a test taking a white cloth and rub it against the jacket? I use Ecoflow regularly and have found it to rub off and stain unless sealed completely. Once this stuff stains, it ain't coming out.
     
  7. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,728
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    I used it without dilution and it covered completely like paint.
    It gave what I would consider a true depot redye look.
    JMO,
    Dave
     
  8. CBI

    CBI Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,382
    done this type of thing many times before. The one issue with Eco-Flo is that it tends to leave a iridescent sheen that one needs to rub away (hard) with a rag. Sometimes, its hard to remove completely. Resolene works well as a sealer.
     
  9. unclegrumpy

    unclegrumpy Active Member

    Messages:
    1,370
    Any advice as far as knocking back the original finish?

    Also, I have always been concerned that I might weaken/damage the thread in the stripping process...is that a valid concern?

    Thanks!
     
  10. CBI

    CBI Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,382
    not sure what you mean. I have only used solvents to remove a finish. Rubbing alcohol can work well to get ride of unwanted dyes, yes, any hard physical stripping is something to avoid IMO.
     
  11. a2jacketpatches

    a2jacketpatches Active Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    Location:
    Northern California
    Acetone? I've used it before and don't think it affects cotton too bad. I've used it to remove glue from the back of period patches just because it doesnt remove the color or hurt the fibers, that I can see. There's always a regular supply in my shop just for things like that. I used it most recently to remove super glue from a Vietnam era cotton baseball type cape with decent results, just slight bleaching but the fabric is still strong and the glue is gone. However, it's got to be doing something so I can't say it's not affecting thread at all. It'll probably tear up any plastic like fibers.
     
  12. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,728
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    IIRC, acetone is what the original AAF depot instructions called for - either I or someone else posted the notes on another thread. I think it's in Sweeting's book on flying clothing.
    Compared to MEK and some other solvents, acetone is a dream to use. Laquer thinner is my next favorite solvent but I've never used it on a jacket.
    I can't remember how I cleaned mine but the dye didn't effect the thread color like one would expect. I suspect that's because it takes dye differently(even if it takes it more).
    If you do one, take note of an original depot refurb jacket. I or someone else can post some pics. There were areas not redyed like under the zipper flap.
    If I did one again, I would try to mimic that look.
    Dave
     
  13. unclegrumpy

    unclegrumpy Active Member

    Messages:
    1,370
    Thanks guys!

    I had always wondered if acetone or some of the other solvents would damage the thread....and which was the preferred one to use.
     
  14. Dr H

    Dr H Active Member

    Messages:
    3,199
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Please take care using acetone - some of the potential effects of repeated contact are not generally known/appreciated.

    Routes of Entry: Absorbed through skin. Dermal contact. Eye contact. Inhalation.

    Toxicity to Animals:
    WARNING: THE LC50 VALUES HEREUNDER ARE ESTIMATED ON THE BASIS OF A 4-HOUR EXPOSURE. Acute oral toxicity (LD50): 3000 mg/kg [Mouse]. Acute toxicity of the vapor (LC50): 44000 mg/m3 4 hours [Mouse].

    Chronic Effects on Humans:
    CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: A4 (Not classifiable for human or animal.) by ACGIH. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Classified Reproductive system/toxin/female, Reproductive system/toxin/male [SUSPECTED]. Causes damage to the following organs: central nervous system (CNS). May cause damage to the following organs: kidneys, the reproductive system, liver, skin.

    Other Toxic Effects on Humans:
    Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of ingestion, of inhalation. Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (permeator). Special Remarks on Toxicity to Animals: Not available.

    Special Remarks on Chronic Effects on Humans:
    May affect genetic material (mutagenicity) based on studies with yeast (S. cerevisiae), bacteria, and hamster fibroblast cells. May cause reproductive effects (fertility) based upon animal studies. May contain trace amounts of benzene and formaldehyde which may cancer and birth defects. Human: passes the placental barrier.

    Special Remarks on other Toxic Effects on Humans:
    Acute Potential Health Effects: Skin: May cause skin irritation. May be harmful if absorbed through the skin. Eyes: Causes eye irritation, characterized by a burning sensation, redness, tearing, inflammation, and possible corneal injury. Inhalation: Inhalation at high concentrations affects the sense organs, brain and causes respiratory tract irritation. It also may affect the Central Nervous System (behavior) characterized by dizzness, drowsiness, confusion, headache, muscle weakeness, and possibly motor incoordination, speech abnormalities, narcotic effects and coma. Inhalation may also affect the gastrointestinal tract (nausea, vomiting). Ingestion: May cause irritation of the digestive (gastrointestinal) tract (nausea, vomiting). It may also affect the Central Nevous System (behavior), characterized by depression, fatigue, excitement, stupor, coma, headache, altered sleep time, ataxia, tremors as well at the blood, liver, and urinary system (kidney, bladder, ureter) and endocrine system. May also have musculoskeletal effects. Chronic Potential Health Effects: Skin: May cause dermatitis. Eyes: Eye irritation.
     
  15. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,728
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    Sounds like a lot if food additives here in the states!
     
  16. unclegrumpy

    unclegrumpy Active Member

    Messages:
    1,370
    Dave, you're right, I think this is something the top bodybuilders use in their power smoothies...
     
  17. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,728
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
  18. unclegrumpy

    unclegrumpy Active Member

    Messages:
    1,370
    Question....I did some internet research, and many sites recommend either alcohol or lemon juice as a step before moving to acetone...does anybody have any thoughts or experience regarding using either of these?

    Thanks!
     
  19. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,728
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    I would think that would just dry it out more. Just guessing.
    Dave
     
  20. rrackleyadams

    rrackleyadams Member

    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    I'm looking forward to learning more about the re-dye process...sadly, the pics above are no longer loading. Does anyone else have experience re-dying at home? If so, I'd like to hear your process, see before & after pics and hear if you overall felt that it was worth it. I have a great Goodwear that I'd like to dye dark seal, but I'm more that happy to leave it alone if I'm risking serious damange!
     

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