Two G1 and a load of questions !

Discussion in 'General Flight Jacket Discussion' started by Tenfifteen, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. Tenfifteen

    Tenfifteen New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Cachan, France
    still waiting for my wrists/waist band... can't wait to work on my 7823B !

    For the Brill Bros. I'm starting to think that it really could be a goatskin, I read dozen of thread on the forum, and most of the time owners say that cowhide is heavy, stiff and cardboard like.
    My Brill is really lightweight ! The Irvin B Foster is heavier, the Brill is also really supple, as thick as the Irvin and the feel under the finger is pretty much similar.

    Here's a close up compare

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    and here some overview of the two jackets :

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    Unfortunatly the zipper has been replaced with a cheap (but sturdy) recent one
    (But as the Brill is not a collector, rather my daily jacket... so it doesn't really matter !)

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    The Irvin B Foster (the leather is now supple, the zipper works almost fine)
    The last thing to do is to change the cuff and waist band (as soon as I receive my replacement)

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    Smithy likes this.
  2. Tenfifteen

    Tenfifteen New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Cachan, France
    umpfff... did it ! I used the original holes
    next : the waist band....

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    That's not perfect, it's my first sewing :D But I really wanted to do all by myself on my old 7823B
     
    robrinay likes this.
  3. Ken at Aero Leather

    Ken at Aero Leather Active Member

    Messages:
    221
    Never had any such problem with Proberts Neats Foot Oil, the Rolls Royce of leather treatment but almost impossible to find these days
     
  4. Ken at Aero Leather

    Ken at Aero Leather Active Member

    Messages:
    221
    Quote The leather was stiff, with paint smudges and snags on the leather.

    If the paint is still on your jacket, removal is real easy provided it's gloss, if you need the method just ask
     
  5. Smithy

    Smithy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    860
    Location:
    Norway
    I've always heard that pure neatsfoot oil can be aggressive with cotton stitching due to the pH nature of the oil. I've talked about this with the artefact conservator at the aviation museum I work for due to my interest in my leather jackets and he said he won't use neatsfoot products as they will darken leather and can be aggressive on old natural fibre stitching. Admittedly he's talking about preserving historic leather flying kit which can be incredibly fragile due to age and wanting to retard any more ageing with a view to keeping any surviving colour and conditions. He also mentioned the difference in tolerance between leather and stitching in terms of the acidity of any treatment. Once again he's dealing with old artefacts which require a certain level of delicacy.

    With my modern jackets he said they won't need so much care but he suggested using a product which wasn't pure neatsfoot oil. Seemed to be that it's OK as an ingredient but not wonderful if the sole ingredient where the pH level can be unsuitable for other materials other than the leather.
     
  6. robrinay

    robrinay Member

    Messages:
    330
    Location:
    Sheffield UK
    Interestingly Wikipedia puts forward a compromise position to the above two perspectives, implying that ‘additives’ to neats foot oil products are guilty of damaging stitching. Perhaps Proberts is unadulterated?
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neatsfoot_oil
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017 at 3:07 AM
  7. Ken at Aero Leather

    Ken at Aero Leather Active Member

    Messages:
    221
    Hi Smithy

    Your Avaiation museum suggested that " neatsfoot products will darken leather"
    We first started using neatsfoot oil back in the 1970s....Proberts only after a couple of tries with other products......because it didn't darken vintage leather for more than during the first 24 hours.
    Admittedly we never used very much and only on really stiff, dried out Horsehide, but the beauty of the treatment was that the follwing day the patina and colour of the leather looked exactly as it had before treating it, yet the leather felt much nicer. Never noticed any problems with the stitching although I doubt I would have seen any as we were only using it on jackets ready to sell, and they didn't hang around long in The Thrift Shop
    More recently we have tried a couple of other makes (couldn't find Proberts) and didn't like the results.........that said I'm the world's most reluctant user of leather treatments on jackets
     
  8. Smithy

    Smithy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    860
    Location:
    Norway
    Hi Ken,

    In all fairness the procedures they use in a museum are pretty extreme and in many cases artefacts are often in a pretty degraded state to begin with so they're obviously very careful and conservative in terms of how they treat anything. Historically unique objects are also displayed in humidity and light level controlled environments so it's obviously very different from a jacket that one of us is wearing around and using.

    Interestingly he told me that the most difficult and problematic objects are actually fabrics and natural materials. Historic aircraft and aircraft parts are much easier (once you've dealt with the asbestos in the airframes and radiation dangers with the instruments).

    Cheers,

    Tim
     
  9. Tenfifteen

    Tenfifteen New Member

    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Cachan, France
    Ok ! The Irvin B Foster is now fully wearable ! Supple, Wrist/Waist band brand new, really nice look but....
    There is something that doesn't match.. don't know what, my Brill bros. fits me better, I feel batter with the Brill, althrough it's a 40 (42 for the Irvin)
    The Brill is thighter but I prefer the cut... I don't feel well with the Irvin... a shame as I prefer the color and the colar of the Irvin :(

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    Smithy likes this.

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