Help with hiding stitch holes

Discussion in 'How To Info' started by Dover, Feb 16, 2018.

  1. Dover

    Dover Member

    Messages:
    41
    I recently purchased an 80's vintage Saddlery A2 jacket for my son. The jacket is goatskin and IMHO quite a
    nice jacket for less than $100. The jacket does have some stitch holes where a squadron patch was removed.
    My question: is there a way to hide or obscure the stitch holes short of adding another patch over them?
    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. B-Man2

    B-Man2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,205
    Dover
    Stitch holes are something that most of us have had to deal with at one point or another. The best solutions for dealing with them still fall short of completely hiding them. I've seen skilled craftsman attempt to use a light filler and smooth the punctured leather lightly back into the holes . A tedious and time consuming effort at best. If it were my jacket I would try to smooth the punctures back into the hole as best as possible and try to use a marker that matches the color of the jacket to lightly color the raw leather around the whole to match the jacket color. Others will have their own methods for dealing with this problem so review them and pick out the method that will work for you.
    Good Luck
    Cheers
    B-Man2
     
    Skip likes this.
  3. Skip

    Skip Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,051
    Location:
    Great Southern Land
    s-l1600.jpg Maverickson, who is a member here, repaired an F.O m422a which is currently for sale. The leather around collar hook stitch holes had weakened and given way. He unstitched the collar and lining and glued in a piece of goat offcut, waited for the glue to set and then hand restitched the collar hook through the original holes. I would never have thought of doing this, but He makes and repairs jackets all the time so has the kit and the know how. Obviously you're not restitching the holes, but if you can't live with the holes and have time, you could do a similar thing by glueing in a piece of leather and then pressing the area to minimise the holes. That along with what B-man2 advised might minimise it somewhat. Be cheaper for you to do it, and may not be worth it to second it out, but If you'd prefer to get Mavericksons opinion on it pm me and I'll drop you his details, he's in the States. You could try PM'ing him but I haven't seen him around here for sometime so not sure if he pops in much.

    pic above is the stitch hole repair, and you'd never know their was a problem in the first place.
     
    Dover and B-Man2 like this.
  4. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,087
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    Dave(Maverickson) does good work. I think I would either attempt to moisturize the jacket in hopes of swelling the fibers a bit or just leave it alone. This is very common, as you know, on WWII A-2s. Perhaps this was not just an enthusiast jacket w/fantasy patch but was, who knows, an A-10 pilot's jacket. Just saying, it's part of the history of the jacket and likely makes it have more of a "been there" look.
    Things like Bickmore Leather Conditioner(Bick 4) would rub down into the stitch holes and with multiple applications might swell the area up a bit which you could then planish down a bit to close the holes. Worth a try on an inexpensive jacket and quite unlikely to do any harm.
    JMO,
    Dave
     
  5. Silver Surfer

    Silver Surfer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,186
    yeah wet the stitch holes and knead the area where the stitch holes are. do it again. let it dry completely. purchase acrylic tube paints. depending on the color match, you may need black, raw umber, burn umber, burnt sienna, yellow ocher. no need to buy high end paints. purchase a small [no 1, or 2 pointy tip] able brush. mix the color as needed, and dab into the holes. press the excess into the hole and wipe off any overage. repeat as needed. the paint has enough body to fill the holes, but may need 2-3 applications to make the hole and indention disappear. generally, the paint drys matte on leather surfaces, so ya may want to go over the paint with a semi gloss or gloss coat if needed. after many many years of experimenting and struggling with the leather jacket hole probs, this is now my go to solution. oh, the other thing you will need is patience. if ya do this, be sure to post your results. wtf???why are there lines through this? dunno, it just happened.
     
    Dover, dmar836 and Roughwear like this.
  6. Dover

    Dover Member

    Messages:
    41
    Excellent thoughts on this problem many thanks to all.
     
  7. B-Man2

    B-Man2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,205
    Just one more thought..........You paid less than $100. for the jacket.
    Unless you do the job yourself , you're looking at somewhere around that number to do the repairs.
     
    Dover likes this.
  8. Silver Surfer

    Silver Surfer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,186
    $100? at the very least, as it is time intensive, and you will be paying for expertise.
     
    Dover likes this.
  9. Tenfifteen

    Tenfifteen Member

    Messages:
    85
    Location:
    Cachan, France
    I have a quick and radical method to hide the stitch holes.................. sewing something over..... ^^
    Seriously, I've tried some kind of tricks like above, it's a very long and painfull job and I was not good enough to do this effectively, I don't bother anymore with that. But my jacket are far from being collectors !
     
  10. Garylafortuna

    Garylafortuna Active Member

    Messages:
    147
    Must have been three or four years ago a former member (a2jacketpatchas) posted a how to on closing stitch holes that looked pretty decent. Try a search on eliminating stitch holes under his name.
     
    Dover and Skip like this.

Share This Page