Cuff Replacement Tutorial

Discussion in 'How To Info' started by fishmeok, Dec 22, 2009.

  1. fishmeok

    fishmeok Member

    Messages:
    886
    I've been meaning to do this for a while, so here goes...

    First, you need to either remove the old cuffs, or make a new jacket (whichever you prefer). Turn the jacket inside out and open up the liner underarm seam on one of the sleeves about 3-4 inches (do this in the middle of the sleeve). Reach in throught the hole and grab the far side of the jacket, then REALLY turn the thing iside out. Cut the threads and remove the old cuffs.

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    Note in the above picture how the jacket is laid out- with the liner on top of the leather and the arms of both laid flat with no twisting. Keep this relationship in your head, this is important to make sure you keep everything lined up!

    Place the new cuff inside the leather sleeve opening with the bottom end pointing toward the armpit. Strech the cuff to match the opening and secure the cuff to the leather (using clips, staples, etc.)

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    Sew the cuff to the leather 1/8 inch from the edge, I find it works best to sew with the leather side up. This is a job that any reasonably stout home machine should be able to do, but you better practice first!

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    Now lay the jacket flat again with the liner on top- match up the liner sleeve with the leather sleeve face to face and with no twisting. Secure the liner to the jacket the same way as above. Sew the liner on 1/2 inch from the edge of the sleeve opening (ABOVE the previous stitch- this is the one that determines where the cuff will fold out).

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    That's it- now reach back through the hole you made in the liner sleeve and pull the jacket rightway round. Sew up the opening in the liner and topstitch to taste.

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    Cheers
    Mark
     
  2. deeb7

    deeb7 New Member

    Messages:
    5,554
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Brilliant, thanks Mark ... the forum needed that. I think it was bgbdesign who posted the cuff tutorial on the old forum, and of course it was lost.
     
  3. fishmeok

    fishmeok Member

    Messages:
    886
    I remember reading over that one several times trying to figure out how to do cuffs... seems so simple to me now... :lol:
    Cheers
    Mark
     
  4. better duck

    better duck Active Member

    Messages:
    1,197
    Location:
    Groningen, Holland
    Hey Mark,
    Great tutorial, even for us folks who have no urge to ever do this ourselves. It was something I always wondered about: How Do They Do It?

    The end result of this tutorial is, that the thread is visible on the outside of the sleeve. What would you have to do to have it hidden, as with most A2s? Keep even closer to the egde of the leather, so that it remains folded into the sleeve?
     
  5. deeb7

    deeb7 New Member

    Messages:
    5,554
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Peter, the last photo is with optional added top stitching ... two pictures above shows how the job is finished for most A-2's.
     
  6. better duck

    better duck Active Member

    Messages:
    1,197
    Location:
    Groningen, Holland
    Oops. sorry about that.
     
  7. better duck

    better duck Active Member

    Messages:
    1,197
    Location:
    Groningen, Holland
    So that's it, isn't it: just for taste and maybe a bit of added strenght.
     
  8. fishmeok

    fishmeok Member

    Messages:
    886
    Strengthwise it's probably not necissary, but topstitching gives it a more finished look.

    Cheers
    Mark
     
  9. zoomer

    zoomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,620
    Location:
    Do X3 ,,Alessandro Guidoni"
    That topstitching - which also went around the waistline - was the first feature to go when A-2s began to be made in any great numbers, around 1939. Of course, the Navy jackets kept it. Still have it.

    I would think it gives a bit of insurance against the knits pulling away due to all the yanking one does on them - especially when stretching the jacket while it's on!
     
  10. ausreenactor

    ausreenactor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,582
    Location:
    Mildura, heart of the Mallee.
    I crap myself whenever I stitch a pair of chevrons on a Class A jacket, the sleeve 'donut' is heck of a hole compared to the
    cuff of a leather jacket. That is a fine motor skill set you have there!!

    Nice work!!

    Couchy
     
  11. How about a lining replacement tutorial?
     
  12. dmar836

    dmar836 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,693
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    Great stuff! Any tips on stitching to the original holes? Is it easier to just sacrifice a few mm and run new stitching......... or is that sacrilege?
    Thanks for sharing all your great work!!
    Dave
    Kansas City, USA
     
  13. fishmeok

    fishmeok Member

    Messages:
    886
    I'll try to remember to take some pics next time i put a jacket together to show the lining. On originals i think you are better off trying to match the original holes, if you have too many, too close the leather will tear like perforated paper.
    Cheers
    Mark
     
  14. ausreenactor

    ausreenactor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,582
    Location:
    Mildura, heart of the Mallee.
    Mark..

    Have located a cheap ELC with mega grain and shot knits. How much for a replacement set and labor? :cool:

    Couchy
     
  15. fishmeok

    fishmeok Member

    Messages:
    886
    Hi Couchy-

    I don't do repair work, too busy making new jackets-

    Back in the day I did my first repair ever completely by hand, while parked in front of the TV. It's time consuming, but relaxing...

    Cheers
    Mark
     
  16. deeb7

    deeb7 New Member

    Messages:
    5,554
    Location:
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Perhaps PLATON is still just charging postage cost. ;)
     
  17. ausreenactor

    ausreenactor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,582
    Location:
    Mildura, heart of the Mallee.
    Mark & David..

    Thanks for the responses...Will try our other makers. Thought about hitting ELC up, but they would want the
    world. It is one of theirs, maybe I could try a warranty claim? :D

    Take care Gents..

    Couchy
     
  18. dujardin

    dujardin Active Member

    Messages:
    5,208
    Location:
    Belgium
    1000 thanks

    great topic
     
  19. tomtom42

    tomtom42 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Hi there,

    thanks a million for the detailed instructions + pics!
    I successfully replaced the knits on an older Schott G1 following your tips.

    Without a sewing machine I did the new seams by hand - not that hard, just takes some time...
    So - if you haven't got a machine - this is totally doable the hard way :=)

    It took me two evenings to replace the cuffs, unfortunately the jacket is too small for me,
    so I donated it to my younger sister - she likes it.

    br,
    Tom
     

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